FACT FRIDAY: The MOST and LEAST Likely Food Allergens

πŸ₯˜ We are often asked about allergens, so we decided to share the 8 most common foods that are likely to present as allergens according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and some of the least likely from one of our favorite books Nobody Ever Told me or my Mother That by Diane Bhar.

🚨 Most likely: Milk (dairy), eggs, fish, shellfish, wheat, peanuts, soy, and treenuts] (Bahr, 2010, p. 73).


βœ… Least likely: Apples, asparagus, avocado, barley, broccoli, carrots, chicken, lettuce, mangoes, oats, peaches, pears, sunflower oil, salmon, lamb, turkey, rice, squash, sweet potatoes, pears, olive oil — and these are just some of the many least likely food options (Bahr, 2010, p. 73-74).

πŸ” Some of the common symptoms to note if you feel your child is experiencing a food allergy are: stuffy or runny nose, wheezing and/or coughing, constipation or diarrhea, gas or abdominal pain, bad breath, gagging or vomiting, excessive colic like behaviors, refusal/dislike of touch, reoccuring sinus/ear and/or chest infections, dark circles or bags around the eyes, red cheeks and/or ear lobes, rashes, eczema, difficulty sleeping, excessive rocking and/or banging head, excessive drooling or perspires easily (Bahr, 2010, p. 72).

πŸ’‘ It is important to introduce one new food at a time to help identify if your child has a food allergy and wait between 3 to 5 days between each new food (CDC, 2018). Be sure to discuss any concerns with your child’s physician and possibly discuss a referral to a pediatric allergist.

πŸ€·β€β™€οΈ How does this relate to picky eating?

This is a top question that we ask during an evaluation. Not only is it for safety, but think about how you feel when you eat something and have discomfort. Allergen symptoms can sometimes be traumatic and/or uncomfortable for the little ones, and we can sometimes use this as an indicator of when β€œpicky eating” started if symptoms were noted and eating decreased. There are many other areas that can lead to picky eating, but this one that we always include in our assessments.

References:
Bahr, D. (2010) Nobody Ever Told Me or my Mother That! Arlington, Texas: Sensory World.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, December 3). When, What, and How to Introduce Solid Foods. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/InfantandToddlerNutrition/foods-and-drinks/when-to-introduce-solid-foods.html

*We also recommend checking out the American Academy of Pediatrics website for more information on food allergies!

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